Fake Ceremonial Cacao, Holy Cow, I wanted to write this post due to the fact that over the last few years, the trend for that ceremonial cacao has grown, and with that comes the fakes. Ceremonial cacao is prepared in a traditional way.

This is done by fermenting the cacao beans and then toasting them lightly before the husk is manually removed. The toasted cacao is ground into cacao paste.

This practice has been in existence for centuries; it ensures high-potency cacao with alkaloids preserved. Ceremonial cacao is made from heirloom strains of cacao from Central and South America.

Unlike conventional cacao or cocoa powder, ceremonial cacao has not been defatted and is minimally processed at low temperatures to maximize its health benefits.

Cacao has been used in shamanic ceremonies across Central and South America for thousands of years. The indigenous cultures used it for rebalancing energies in the body, inner awakening, and healing.

Unlike other common shamanic journeys, cacao does not get you “high” or give you a psychedelic experience.

Real Ceremonial Cacao

Fake Ceremonial Cacao

Holy Cow Fake Ceremonial Cacao, I wanted to write this post due to the fact that over the last few years, the trend for that ceremonial cacao has grown, and with that comes the fakes. Ceremonial cacao is prepared in a traditional way.

This is done by fermenting the cacao beans and then toasting them lightly before the husk is manually removed. The toasted cacao is ground into cacao paste.

This practice has been in existence for centuries; it ensures high-potency cacao with alkaloids preserved. Ceremonial cacao is made from heirloom strains of cacao from Central and South America.

Unlike conventional cacao or cocoa powder, ceremonial cacao has not been defatted and is minimally processed at low temperatures to maximize its health benefits.

Cacao has been used in shamanic ceremonies across Central and South America for thousands of years. The indigenous cultures used it for rebalancing energies in the body, inner awakening, and healing.

Unlike other common shamanic journeys, cacao does not get you “high” or give you a psychedelic experience.

Holy Cow Fake Ceremonial Cacao has appeared all over Lake Atitlan, on Facebook and websites. Cacao is not grown around Lake Atitlan. Cacao is grown in the coastal regions of Guatemala.

I can go into any legitimate, non-fake cacao shop and buy ceremonial cacao for Q50 a block, or $6.35, but I later discover that certain websites are selling cacao in some form for $35 to $55 for a 12-once pack plus shipping.

Websites make the claim to assist local communities, but where is the money going?

If you would like to find real Cacao

2 + 6 = ?